• Most of the dairy cows living in Florida are Holsteins (the black and white cows).
  • Lafayette is Florida’s leading dairy county with 21 farms; Okeechobee is second with 19.
  • Most Florida dairy herds range in size from 150 cows to 5,000 cows
  • The state’s more than 130 dairy farms are primarily owned and operated by second- and third-generation farmers.
  • Florida dairy farmers recycle about 170,000 tons of byproducts such as citrus pulp, brewers’ grain and whole cottonseed that are consumed by the cows instead of ending up in landfills.
  • There are about 122,000 dairy cows in Florida that collectively produce about 2.34 billion pounds of milk a year.
  • The total represents 272 million gallons of Florida-produced milk in the grocery store.
  • Each Florida dairy cow produces about 18,600 pounds of milk annually or about six to eight gallons of milk each day.
  • Milk has played an important role in America’s history since 1611 when the first cows were brought to Jamestown, Va.
  • The average dairy cow weighs 1,400 pounds, which is about the same size of a mature male polar bear.
  • Cows drink 25-50 gallons of water a day. That’s enough to fill a bathtub!
  • Cows chew their cud at least 50 times per minute.
  • Cows can go up stairs, but not down stairs.
  • Cows have ID tags on their ears to identify them and record how much milk they are producing, plus other important information about the animal’s health.
  • According to ancient records passed down through the centuries, the making of cheese dates back more than 4,000 years.
  • One gallon of milk is approximately 345 squirts of a cow’s udder.
  • More than 7,000 years ago, domesticated cattle appeared along the Tigris and Euphrates river valley, the origin of the first agricultural society of the Sumerians. The ancient Egyptians made cheese, and Isis, the Egyptian goddess and patroness of agriculture, is often represented as a woman with the horns of a cow, a sacred animal.